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Blog 4

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/02/16/515555428/a-day-without-immigrants-promises-a-national-strike-thursday

José Andrés is a high-profile chef who decided to close his restaurants in Washington DC in honor of the Day Without Immigrants strike. Another chef, Rick Bayless shut down four restaurants in Chicago for the day. Both of these sources are good because they are first-hand accounts. The chefs are adding to the impact of the protests by shutting down to support their employees who want to protest. However, I believe that NPR could have used their accounts more substantially to add value to the piece. For example, the author could have quoted them about any personal connection they have to the cause. A baker, Ahmad Erfani was born in Iran and grew up in France. He closed his bakery. His testimonial was key in this piece as France is not one of the countries that comes to mind when most people think about immigration. Unlike the chefs, he seems more connected to the cause as he is an immigrant and uses the word “we” when talking about the workers. To find these sources, the author, Bill Chappell probably found a list of businesses that were shutting down for the day.

The piece quotes another reporter who quotes LA County Supervisor Hilda Solis. Solis provides statistics. He talks about how integral immigrants are to Los Angeles not only socially and culturally, but also economically as he says that immigrants contribute about 40 percent of LA’s GDP. To find this source, the original author Danielle Karson probably talked to politicians in LA because of its large immigrant population.

The article shows a tweet from a teacher about how over half of her students stayed home the day of the protest. Her tweet was used to show that not only are adults involved in the protest, but so are children. Her testimony could have been more substantial had she been interviewed and quoted about how integral immigrants are to the community and her class room. To find this source, Chappell was probably looking for tweets related to the topic.

Language Partners Creates Conversation

The Mizzou Women’s center hosted a Language Partners event on Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017.  Language partners helps create dialogue between native and non-native English speakers. Participants played a game to show similarities between everyone despite their different backgrounds. “When we first got there I felt very different from everyone else, but after a little while I felt more similar. We did a little game thing where you had to say something about you and people had to stand up if it applied to them. Obviously the point is to see how you have stuff in common with people that you don’t expect to at all, but it really worked and it was cool,” said Ivy Hettinger, MU sophomore.

The participants then broke into small groups for conversation. In small groups they had conversations about Black History Month, what they did over winter break, and various cultural differences and similarities. The groups then broke into pairs to have individual conversations

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Dina Adel, MU sophomore, is from Cairo, Egypt. She listens while another student talks about her most recently read book during a small group conversation at the Language Partners event on Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. Language Partners “pairs one native English speaker with one non-native English speaker. The pairs get together once a week for a minimum of one hour and practice conversational English. The program is a great opportunity to learn about another culture and make a new friend. The focus of the program is to assist the non-native English speaker with their conversational English, awareness of North American culture and knowledge of living in Columbia, MO,” according to the Mizzou Women’s center Website. (Scene Setter/Relationships)
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Emily Pai is a second year master’s student at MU from Taiwan. “Language is the hardest part about being (in America) because I have to work very hard to finish my assignments and another hard thing is making friends with native classmates,” Pai says. (Portrait)
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Pai pounds her hands on the armrest when she thinks of an answer to a question on Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. (Detail)
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Sherri Hsu, a second year master’s student at MU, is from Taiwan and has been at Mizzou for a semester. Hsu said that she came to Mizzou “because I wanted to be an exchange student and my advisor had a connection (to Mizzou), so he approached me and said, ‘Do you want to go to the U.S.? They have more details and techniques that you can learn from,’ so I thought why not because America is so big and I want to learn more about the technical (aspects of my major), so that’s why I came here.” (Portrait)
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Ivy Hettinger, MU sophomore from Chicago, and Hsu both fidget with their hands while listening to another person speak on Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017. “Meeting new people was fun. There was one girl there from Taiwan who I talked to, and she was saying how she really misses the food at home which I could definitely relate to. Plus, I don’t do a lot of activities like (Language Partners), so the whole experience was new and I liked it,” Hettinger said. (Detail/Closer)

Blog Post 3

Armando L. Sanchez’s Photo Story

This piece has very strong central characters. After looking at his pictures the viewer feels like he was in the class with Paul Wade and the children.  The pictures do a very good job showing Wade’s gentleness even though he is teaching children to fight. I love the fifth picture of Chaya Wade and Jonathan Pineda sparing. The picture is a perfect example of conflict and character. In Chaya Wade’s face you can see how much effort and force she is putting into the punch and you can see Pineda’s surprise from getting hit. For expert testimony, the photographer shows Wade teaching and Sanchez’s captions make it very clear that Wade knows what he is talking about.

Most of Sanchez’s pictures use the rule of thirds. His use of the rule makes the pictures more visually interesting and draw the viewer’s attention where he wants it. Since most of the pictures use the rule of thirds, the pictures that do not use the rule stand out. For example, the first photo of Wade and his daughter stands out because they are centered and fill the frame. Sanchez has a lot of variation as to where the subjects are positioned. The variation makes the pictures more visually interesting when viewed together.

The only thing that I would change is that some of the pictures seem dark especially the third and second to last pictures.

Brittany Greeson’s Photo Story

Each photo has its own central character. However, the story as a whole does not have a central character. The conflict of the story is between the apartment building and its residents who are angry about the cost of rent. Each photo has a different viewpoint, however none of them are positive of the apartment complex.

The photographer played with light. Some of the pictures were bright others were shadowy. I do not think that the lighting added a lot. Most of the indoor photos are too dark. The third and ninth photos are too yellow. In the fourth photo, the woman’s hands are very blurry and I think that they distract from her expression.

Had I done this project, I would have focused on fewer people to create a stronger central character. Focusing on fewer people would help the viewer connect with the characters more and relate more to them. I thought that this story felt more scatter brained and less cohesive because every picture was vastly different without much connecting one picture to another.

Real Person Resubmit

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Brittany Burklund, MU freshman, eats at Plaza 900 on Monday, January 30, 2017. Burklund is a child life specialist major and has always known that she wants to work with children. “I have always loved kids. I have been babysitting since I was nine,” Burklund said, “I have been carrying around a doll for as long as I can remember and my mom worked with kids a lot, so I got a lot of that from her.”

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Moriah Gord, MU freshman, eats at Plaza 900 on Monday, January 30, 2017. Gord is from Chicago and said that the events at Mizzou from last year has had an impact on Mizzou’s admissions. “I am the only person from my high school that came here…I think that people [chose not to come to Mizzou] because of what happened last fall. I used to [think about it frequently], but I’m not experiencing anything. I like it here.”
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Warren Wood, MU sophomore, eats at Plaza 900 on Monday, January 30, 2017. Wood was unaware of his Asperger’s syndrome diagnosis until he graduated high school two years ago. “I have, since two, been diagnosed with a mild form of Asperger’s syndrome, otherwise known as high functioning autism, though I wasn’t told until right when I was graduating high school,” Wood said, “[It is] not the best news that I have ever received especially as how the end of high school was a less than stable time.”

Real Person

J2150_McGarr_Person_Burklund
Brittany Burklund eats at Plaza 900 on Monday January 30, 2017. Burklund is a child life specialist major and has always known that she wants to work with children. “I have always loved kids. I have been babysitting since I was nine,” Burklund said, “I have been carrying around a doll for as long as I can remember and my mom worked with kids a lot, so I got a lot of that from her.”

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Moriah Gore eats at Plaza 900 on Monday January 30, 2017. Gore is from Chicago and said that the events at Mizzou from last year has had an impact on Mizzou’s admissions. “I am the only person from my high school that came here,” Gore said, “I think that people [chose not to come to Mizzou] because of what happened last fall. I used to [think about it frequently], but I’m not experiencing anything. I like it here.”
J2150_McGarr_People_Wood
Warren Wood eats at Plaza 900 January 30 2017. Wood was unaware of his Asperger’s syndrome diagnosis until he graduated high school two years ago.  “I have, since two, been diagnosed with a mild form of Asperger’s syndrome, otherwise known as high functioning autism, though I wasn’t told until right when I was graduating high school,” Wood said, “[It is] not the best news that I have ever received especially as how the end of high school was a less than stable time.”

Blog 1-French Election and Story Elements

The New York Times’ piece With French Socialists in Crisis, Manuel Valls and Benoît Hamon Head to Runoff by Alissa J. Rubin includes all of the fundamental elements needed for a good story.

Central Compelling Character–  The story starts with a strong visual of a central character, Jean-Marc Ducourtioux “shout[ing] with his fellow union members as they banged on the plexiglass window of a meeting hall in small-town France.”  Rubin then goes into explaining that Ducourtioux is a member of France’s oldest trade union who used to consistently vote in favor of the Socialist Party, but not anymore.  Rubin explains Ducourtioux’s dissatisfaction with France’s Socialist Party (and the current socialist president, François Hollande) and how it has failed to keep French automakers from moving factories out of the country.  Ducourtioux has been a metal worker for the past thirty years and he has been an active voter, so he has a clear steak in this issue.  Ducourtioux is used to represent the general French public.  Rubin also mentions the story of Vincent Gérard who has lost 80 percent of his clients for his small business throughout François Hollande’s presidency because of the movement of business out of the country.

Conflict/Tension–  Rubin states that, “France’s presidential election this year is being closely watched as a barometer of European public dissatisfaction.”  The current president François Hollande is so deeply unfavored that he is not even running for re-election.  This election will reflect the political climate in France and more broadly Europe.  This election will be particularly interesting since the American election showed that many Americans are dissatisfied with the current government by electing Donald Trump.  The French election will give more hints as to weather the dissatisfaction is most prevalent in the United States or if it is much broader than that.

Data/Expert Testimony– The article cites the result of a left-wing primary where socialist Manuel Valls came in second out of the seven candidates.  Second to Benoît Hamon who was François Hollande’s education minister.  However, the most important part of the Primary is that the voter turnout was down by around 50 percent from the last left-wing primary in 2011.  Rubin notes that few analysts believe that any Socialists have a chance at winning the presidency in the general election.  Philippe Marlière, a professor of French and European politics at University College London said that the Socialists are struggling all over Europe.  Rubin also mentions the opinions of other various professors and political commentators.

Multiple Viewpoints–   This article reflects stories from citizens Jean-Marc Ducourtioux and Vincent Gérard explaining why they are dissatisfied with the current government.  The article also reflects the viewpoints of various professors and political experts from both France and England

Link: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/22/world/europe/france-left-socialist-primary.html?smid=tw-nytimesworld&smtyp=cur&_r=1